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TIPS FOR COPING WITH THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK

If you’re feeling nervous about the coronavirus, you’re not alone. Being concerned and empathetic about this outbreak is normal. However, you may experience feelings of discomfort, impacting concentration, productivity, and even disrupting sleep patterns. As part of your healthcare plan, you have access to resources to help you.

What to do if you are stressed because of the news.

If you’re feeling nervous about the coronavirus, you’re not alone. Being concerned and empathetic about this outbreak is normal. However, you may experience feelings of discomfort, impacting concentration, productivity, and even disrupting sleep patterns.

What you can do to feel better.

  • Stick to the facts as communicated by public-health agencies or medical professionals. Instead of reading every article and going to every website, staying offline for a period can be beneficial. If you’re concerned, sites that include accurate information include the World Health Organization and the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC).
  • Try and keep it in perspective. Social media and news outlets can amplify misinformation. 
  • Follow prevention tips to stay healthy. Washing your hands often and properly is the single most effective way to stop the spread of disease.
  • Practice stress and anxiety management. There are many proven ways to reduce stress and anxiety: getting enough sleep, a balanced diet, and hydration, exercise, talking about your fears with others, meditation, and more. Find the self-care practice that works for you
  • Seek help from your Employee Assistance Program (EAP). You have access to professional assistance and resources 24/7 – from connecting with a counselor to learning how to meditate, find confidential help that can help you move forward.

Building resiliency in times of uncertainty.

We are living in a complex world with change all around us. Naturally, this can make you feel uncertain or fearful about the present and future. The good news is that resiliency – the ability to thrive in times of change and uncertainty – is learned, and you can start building your resilience today. Use the tips below to take on a more flexible, resilient mindset.

  • Accept what’s out of your control. Focusing on that which you have no control over will leave you feeling frustrated and exhausted. There are certain circumstances or decisions that are not in your power to control. Let go of them. Doing so will help you move on and focus your energy more positively. Remember: though you may not be able to change these realities, you can change how you respond to them.
  • Embrace change. There will always be change. Instead of concentrating on the disruptive aspects, take a flexible approach, and accept that change is a fundamental part of life that can also bring opportunities and positive outcomes.
  • Stay focused on the big picture. It’s easy to get so wrapped up in the details of an event that you blow it out of proportion. Avoid “catastrophizing” and focus in on the real (or most realistic) impact. Looking at it from a broader perspective can help you more accurately assess its significance.
  • Maintain a positive attitude. Resilience doesn’t mean you have a positive feeling about every negative situation. It means that despite something going wrong you believe you can and will do your best to deal with the situation and move forward.
  • Connect with others. Having people around you (either from a safe distance in-person or digitally) with whom you can share feelings, discuss problems, and receive advice is an essential part of weathering life’s storms. It’s also important to reach out for help when you feel overwhelmed by a situation.

Access your Employee Assistance Program (EAP) 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at workhealthlife.com/standard3. Click here to learn more.

Please call (401) 234-1530 to speak with a member of our team if you have any questions or concerns.

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